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Steven A. Tomeo & Associates, LLC

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Steven A. Tomeo & Associates, LLC

Avoid Jail Time For A Second Or Third DUI In Connecticut 1122401786Avoiding jail time if convicted of a second or third DUI is virtually impossible because Connecticut has mandatory minimum sentencing, which may not be suspended or reduced in any manner by the Judge. Once a convicted person is sent to prison, the Commissioner of Corrections can grant early release.

Can I get a Connecticut pretrial alcohol education program as a repeat DUI offender?

It depends. If you are granted AEP then you can get that program, again, after ten (10) years. However, if you have a DUI conviction on your record, you are not eligible for AEP. Example: Mr. Driver is arrested for a DUI on January 1, 2020. This is his first DUI in his lifetime. Then on January 25, 2020, while the January 1 DUI is still pending, he is arrested, again, for a DUI. These are back to back DUIs. As to the January 1, 2020 DUI he is eligible to apply for AEP. It is within the discretion of the Trial Court Judge to grant the program—he is eligible to apply for AEP. As to the second charge, he is not eligible.

What if I have a New York DWI conviction on my record and now have a DUI in Connecticut? Will I still be eligible for certain programs?

The New York Driving While Impaired (DWI) statute is not considered a DUI in the State of Connecticut. So, a conviction in New York for Driving While Impaired (DWI) is not considered a prior conviction in Connecticut. So, if you are convicted of a DWI in New York and then after that you are arrested for a DUI in Connecticut, you would be eligible for the AEP in Connecticut. However, it is important to note that the granting of AEP is up to the discretion of the Trial Court Judge who can deny granting you the program, even if you are eligible to apply for it.

What Is Connecticut’s Home Confinement Program for Repeat DUI Offenders?

Once convicted in Connecticut of DUI or any other crime, a person is committed to the Commissioner of Corrections who has jurisdiction over the convicted person. The Corrections Department operates under its own policies and procedures in deciding whether the offender will be released and given an ankle bracelet for monitoring purposes. If it is decided that an offender will be given an ankle monitor, then they will likely be on parole and confined to a certain area, such as the perimeter of their home.

Is a Second DUI A Felony In Connecticut?

In Connecticut, a second DUI offense is not automatically classified as a felony. However, depending on the circumstances of the case, a second DUI conviction can be charged as a felony.

Connecticut law categorizes DUI offenses based on severity, with first and second offenses considered misdemeanors. However, a second DUI conviction within ten years of the first offense can result in enhanced penalties, including longer license suspension, mandatory ignition interlock device installation, and increased fines.

Additionally, suppose the second DUI offense involves aggravating factors such as causing serious injury or death to another person or driving with a blood alcohol content (BAC) of .16% or higher. In that case, it may be charged as a felony.

It’s important to note that the consequences of a second DUI conviction in Connecticut can still be severe, even if it is not classified as a felony. Anyone facing a DUI charge in Connecticut should consult with an experienced DUI attorney to understand the potential consequences and legal options available to them.

What Defenses Are Commonly Used For A Second DUI Charge In Connecticut?

If you face a second DUI charge in Connecticut, it’s essential to understand that the consequences can be severe. To defend against a second DUI charge, seek the guidance of an experienced criminal defense attorney. Here are some strategies that your attorney may employ to defend your case:

  1. Challenge the evidence: Your attorney may investigate whether the police followed proper procedures when administering field sobriety tests, breath tests, or blood tests. They may also scrutinize the accuracy of the testing equipment used to measure your BAC.
  2. Challenge the stop: Your attorney may investigate whether the police had probable cause to stop you in the first place. Any evidence obtained after the stop might be inadmissible in court if they did not.
  3. Argue lack of intent: Your attorney may argue that you did not have the intent to drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol, such as if you consumed alcohol after you stopped driving.
  4. Negotiate a plea bargain: If the evidence against you is strong, your attorney may work to negotiate a plea bargain to minimize the penalties associated with a second DUI conviction.

Defending a second DUI charge in Connecticut can be complex, and the best strategy will depend on the unique circumstances of your case. It’s crucial to work with a skilled felony DUI lawyer who can guide you through the process and protect your legal rights.

How Long Is A Jail Sentence For A Second DUI Offense?

Connecticut’s penalties for a second DUI offense can be significant, including potential jail time. The length of the jail sentence for a second DUI conviction in Connecticut depends on the case’s specific circumstances.

For a second DUI conviction within ten years of the first offense, the minimum mandatory sentence is 120 consecutive days in jail, with a maximum possible sentence of two years. However, the actual sentence may vary depending on factors such as the defendant’s blood alcohol content, whether there was an accident or injuries involved, and whether the defendant has any prior criminal convictions.

In addition to jail time, a second DUI conviction in Connecticut can result in penalties such as fines, community service, probation, and license suspension. It’s important to note that the consequences of a second DUI conviction can be severe and long-lasting, impacting employment, education, and other aspects of life. If you are facing a second DUI charge in Connecticut, you must consult an experienced felony drunk driving attorney to understand your legal options and potential consequences.

What Happens After A Third DUI?

In Connecticut, a third DUI offense can have serious consequences, including increased fines, longer license suspension, and possible jail time. The penalties for a third DUI offense in Connecticut depend on the case’s specific circumstances, including the defendant’s blood alcohol content, prior criminal convictions, and whether there were any accidents or injuries involved.

If convicted of a third DUI offense, the minimum mandatory sentence is one year in jail, with a maximum possible sentence of three years in jail. The offender may also face fines ranging from $2,000 to $8,000, a license suspension of up to three years, and mandatory participation in an alcohol treatment program.

In addition to the legal consequences, a third DUI conviction can have a long-lasting impact on the offender’s personal and professional life, including potential employment and education consequences.

It’s important to note that the consequences of a third DUI conviction in Connecticut can be severe, and it’s imperative to consult with an experienced DUI lawyer if you are facing a third DUI charge to understand your legal options and potential consequences.

I have multiple DUI convictions in Connecticut. How will I get to work?

 Special Operator’s Permit

(“Work Permit / Education Permit / Medical Permit”)

If your driver’s license is under suspension you may apply for a Special Operator’s Permit that will allow you to drive to and from work, attend classes or examinations at accredited institutions of higher education, or to ongoing medical treatments. If approved, the permit must be carried with you when driving and all restrictions must be followed. You may not operate a commercial or public service motor vehicle with a Special Operator’s Permit. To apply for a Special Operator’s Permit:

Work Permit

  • Complete the Special Operators Permit Application(form MD-1).
  • If you are self-employed, you must submit a copy of your business filing from the CT Secretary of State or the most recent business income tax return indicating the applicant as a principal or owner of business.
  • See instructions for all applications below.

Education Permit

  • Complete the Special Operators Permit Application(form MD-1).
  • Obtain and submit a certified copy of your class and examination schedule clearly identifying the days, hours, and geographic locations of your classes.
  • See instructions for all applications below.

Medical Permit

  • A medical permit is only for ongoing medical treatment.

    Ongoing medical treatment is defined as treatment by or prescribed by a medical provider that requires travel to a treatment facility one or more times per week and is essential to maintaining your life or health, where without the treatment, may adversely affect your condition.

  • Complete the Special Operators Permit Application(form MD-1).
  • If your license is medically withdrawn you do not qualify for a medical permit.
  • See instructions for all applications below.

All applications – additional instructions:

  • All applications can be mailed. You may also scan completed applications and email to DMV.Suspension@ct.gov
  • DMV will verify your application and review your driving record as part of the application process. Applicants must meet qualifications list below.
  • Out-of-State Drivers: If you are licensed in another state, you must provide a recent certified copy of your driving record from that jurisdiction. DMV does not accept driving records from private vendors.
  • A non-refundable $100 application fee must accompany each permit request.

To qualify for a Special Operator’s Permit, you must:

  • Not be currently suspended for failure to appear/pay a citation.
  • Not be currently suspended for Operating While Under Suspension.
  • Not have a prior alcohol-related offense.
  • Not have three or more prior moving violations as specified in Connecticut General Statute 14-111g(a) on your driving history.
  • Not have two or more prior moving violations on your driving history if you are currently suspended for Reckless Driving or Evading Responsibility.
  • Not have a violation of Vehicular Manslaughter or Vehicular Assault.

When driving with a Special Operator’s Permit, please remember the following:

  • Special Operator’s Permits are subject to strict standards for approval and use.
  • You cannot operate a motor vehicle unless the Special Operator’s Permit is in your possession.
  • Misuse of a permit, conviction of a traffic citation, or a new license suspension while operating under a permit may result in revocation of the permit and other penalties.
  • Driving Outside Connecticut: If you intend to operate outside of Connecticut, you must check with law enforcement in that state to determine if a Connecticut permit is honored.

For more information, please call STEVEN A. TOMEO & ASSOCIATES, LLC.

For more information on DUI Cases, a free initial consultation is your next best step. Get the information and legal answers you are seeking by calling (860) 764-2744 today.

STEVEN TOMEO, ESQ.
CALL FOR A FREE CONSULTATION
(860) 764-2744